Thursday, August 25, 2016

Greenland - Nordic Food Culture 2016



The joint Nordic series, which is published every two years, has this year the common theme of ’Food culture’. POST Greenland’s two 2016 Nordic Stamps each depict popular culinary specialties from Greenland: Ammassat and mattak (raw whale skin).

The small ammassak come to Greenland’s waters in large schools throughout the year and may be eaten cooked or dried. Whale mattak is the greatest delicacy in Greenland. It is packed with, inter alia, Vitamin C and tastes like an avocado but is, inversely, very tough. The stamp features mattak from a narwhal.

Technical Details:

Issue Date: 21.03.2016
Designer: Bolatta Silis–H√łegh
Printer: Lowe-Martin Group
Process: Offset
Colours: 4 Colours
Size: 40,00 x 28,50 mm
Values: DKK 12.00, 13.50

Comment by Bolatta Silis-Hoegh, artist:

”Ammassat and mattak (raw whale skin) are the first two things, I think of when considering our food culture in Greenland. The small animals and the gigantic animal. Both have been essential for survival in the Arctic.

I like the idea of a piece of mattak or ammassak, the size of an envelope ... just to eat. And, for the recipient who may not know what mattak is may, one would think ”what is it?” - and the subject then becomes even more curious when thinking about the story behind the stamps.

The small ammassak come to Greenland’s waters in large schools throughout the year and may be eaten cooked or dried and I like to dip the tit bits stored in seal fat. Whale mattak is the greatest delicacy in Greenland. It is packed with, inter alia, Vitamin C and tastes like an avocado but is, inversely, very tough. The stamp features mattak from a narwhal. Mattak may be enjoyed with a little salt, aromatics and soy sauce (or how your family normally eat it).

And most of Greenlandic food is prepared for people to eat it together. The whale is the final link in the food chain and it is affected by the large amounts of heavy metals, the world’s pollution transmitter with sea currents travelling to the Arctic. In this way these large, peaceful animals, that we must take care of, look after the environment in all parts of the world. ”